Photo by: Purwo Kuncoro

Introducing Our Fall 2015 Grantees

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Fall2015_grantee_collage

Top L: Timothy Campbell, R: Kaitlin Wellens, Middle: Meagan Rubel, Bottom L: Jamie Clark, R: Fredrick Manthi

The Leakey Foundation held its Fall Granting Session on  December 5, 2015. Our Board of Trustees unanimously approved twenty three research grant proposals for funding this cycle.

Here are some numbers from our Fall 2015 Granting Cycle:

There were 101 applications for research grants. 45% were categorized as behavioral, and 55% were paleoanthropology.

498 reviews were submitted to our grants department this cycle. Thank you to our reviewers! We could not do it without you.

We would like to congratulate all of our new grantees, and we look forward to sharing news and information about them and their research along the way!

Behavioral

Corinne Yvonne Ackermann, Université de Neuchâtel:  Social bonds and oxytocin in wild juvenile chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes)

Alexis Amann, City University of New York:  Female counterstrategies to male sexual coercion in Ethiopian Hamadryas baboons

Joseph Feldblum, Duke University:  The benefits of male relationships in the Gombe chimpanzees

Marian Hamilton, University of New Mexico:  Assessing philopatry and range size with strontium isotopes

Katharine Jack, Tulane University:  Making an alpha male: Socioendocrinology of dominance in male white-faced capuchin monkeys (Cebus capucinus)

Cheryl Knott, Boston University:  Diet quality and fiber digestion in wild Bornean orangutans

Meagan Rubel, University of Pennsylvania:  Effect of diet and parasites on the gut metagenomics of environmentally diverse Africans

Stephanie Spehar, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh:  The orangutans of Wehea: Adaptation to an extreme environment

Kaitlin Wellens, The George Washington University:  Maternal effects on juvenile chimpanzee social behavior and physiological stress

Paleoanthropology

Abdeljalil Bouzouggar, University of Oxford:  A coastal corridor route for earliest Homo sapiens dispersal into Northwest Africa

Timothy Campbell, Texas A&M University:  Paleoenvironmental reconstruction of Sterkfontein and Swartkrans using rodent postcrania

Yonatan Sahle Chemere, University of Tübingen:  The archaeology of anatomically modern humans from Halibee, Ethiopia

Jamie Clark, University of Alaska Fairbanks:  Early Upper Paleolithic hunting strategies at Mughr el-Hamamah, Jordan

Dorothée Drucker, University of Tübingen:  Isotopes, diet and human adaptation in a Mediterranean context

Erin Franks, University of Notre Dame:  Regional and hierarchical assessment of cranial plasticity and dietary adaptations

Genevieve Housman, Arizona State University:  Assessment of DNA methylation patterns in primate skeletal tissues

Jean-Jacques Jaeger, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS):  Searching for early evolution of African anthropoids in Myanmar

Julie Lesnik, Wayne State University:  An evaluation of termite-associated hydrocarbon signatures as an influence on prey selectivity and an ecological signal for chimpanzees and Olduvai hominins

Fredrick Manthi, University of Utah:  Investigation of Middle Pleistocene sites in the Turkana Basin, Kenya

Kathryn Ranhorn, The George Washington University:  New approaches to the archaeology of modern human origins

Sileshi Semaw, Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH):  Investigating Middle Stone Age (MSA) archaeology and an associated hominin at Gona, Afar, Ethiopia

Warren Sharp, Berkeley Geochronology Center:  Age and paleoenvironment of the Ysterfontein 1 Site, South Africa

Krishna Veeramah, Stony Brook University:  Validating novel mutations in a whole genome sequenced gibbon quartet

 



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