Photo by: Purwo Kuncoro

Presenting Our Fall 2014 Leakey Foundation Grantees!

On December 6th The Leakey Foundation’s Board of Trustees convened for our Fall 2014 Granting Session. The Board unanimously approved the twenty-five research grants our Scientific Executive Committee presented as recommended for funding.

Here are a few numbers from our Fall 2014 Granting Cycle:

  • There were 75 research grant applications
  • 40% were categorized as behavioral, 60% were paleoanthropology
  • Over 400 reviews were submitted to our grants department during this cycle
  • Of the 25 approved grants, 11 were submitted by PhD candidates

We would like to congratulate all of our new grantees, and we look forward to sharing news and information about them and their research along the way! 

Here are The Leakey Foundation’s Fall 2014 Grantees:

Thure Cerling, University of Utah:  Stable isotopes of fossil primates in Kenya

Naomi Cleghorn, University of Texas, Arlington:  Investigating a rare Early Later Stone Age site at Knysna, South Africa

Constance Dubuc, New York University:  Male-male competition, sexual dimorphism and alternative reproductive strategies in a non-human primate: A morphological approach

Alexander Georgiev, University of Chicago:  Male oxidative stress and female mate choice in rhesus macaques

Michael Granatosky, Duke University:  Gait mechanics of inverted walking: Implications for evolution of suspensory behavior

Alia Gurtov, University of Wisconsin, Madison:  Dental microwear analysis of Early Pleistocene hominin foraging seasonality

Andrew Halley, University of California, Berkeley:  Determining the embryonic origins of human and primate encephalization

Amanda Lea, Duke University:  Effects of social conditions on DNA methylation and immune function

Fredrick Manthi, National Museums of Kenya: Investigation of new Pleistocene sites in the Turkana Basin, Kenya

Emily McLean, Duke University:  Direct and indirect genetic effects on social behaviors in baboons

Armand Salvador Mijares, University of the Philippines:  The 2015 archaeological excavation of Callao Cave, northern Luzon, Philippines

Elizabeth Moffett, University of Missouri:  Birth and its effects on anthropoid pelvic shape and integration

David Pappano, Princeton University:  Dynamic network analysis of gelada herding and movement

Marta Pina, Institut Català de Paleontologia Miquel Crusafont:  Hindlimb mechanical properties in Miocene apes: Origins of human locomotion

Samantha Porter, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities:  Investigating cultural transmission across the MP-UP transition in western Europe

Shelby Putt, University of Iowa:  Investigating the co-evolution of language and toolmaking: An fNIRS study

Rhonda QuinnSeton Hall University:  Refining paleosol isotopic evidence from Omo-Turkana hominin environments

Michael Rogers, Southern Connecticut State University:  The Oldowan-Acheulian transition at Gona, Ethiopia: Archaeological and geological studies

Clara Scarry, University of Texas, Austin:  Evolution and maintenance of male cooperation among tufted capuchin monkeys

Gabriele Schino, Istituto di Scienze e Tecnologie della Cognizione, C.N.R.:  The emotional basis of primate reciprocity

Nicole Squyres, Johns Hopkins University:  Morphological variation in the distal femur of modern humans and fossil hominins

Adam  Sylvester, University of Glasgow:  Reconstructing walking kinematics from femoral condyle curvature in fossil hominins

Maura Tyrrell, University at Buffalo, State University of New York:  Effect of competition on male coalition patterns in crested macaques

Sarie Van Belle, University of Texas at Austin:  Paternity and kinship in socially monogamous saki and titi monkeys

Brian Wood, Yale University:  Stone tools as digging implements: Archaeological, energetic, and biomechanical implications



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