Photo by: Purwo Kuncoro

Introducing Our Fall 2017 Grantees

The Leakey Foundation held our fall 2017 granting session on December 2, 2017. Our Board of Trustees unanimously approved 23 research grant proposals for funding.

Here are some numbers from our fall 2017 granting cycle:

There were 96 applications for research grants this cycle.

40% of the proposals were categorized as behavioral, and 60% were paleoanthropology.

416 reviews were submitted to our grants department this cycle. Thank you to our reviewers! We could not do it without you.

We would like to congratulate all of our new grantees, and we look forward to sharing news and information about them and their research along the way!

Brendan Barrett of the University of California, Davis

Behavioral

Brendan Barrett, University of California Davis:  Stone tool use & taxonomic status of Coiba Archipelago capuchins

Leveda Cheng, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology:  Behavioural and endocrinological correlates of intergroup encounters in bonobos

Alba García de la Chica, University of Barcelona:  Behavioral, hormonal and life-history correlates of pairbonding in owl monkeys

Sharon Gursky, Texas A&M University:  The function of ultrasonic vocalizations in spectral tarsiers.

Duna Susie Lee, New York University:  The role of testosterone in the modulation of parental behaviors in female rhesus macaques

Elizabeth Mallott, Northwestern University:  Response of primate gut microbiome function to increased faunivory

Caroline Schuppli, University of Zürich:  Orangutan mothers’ adaptive strategies to make their infants develop fast

Meagan Vakiener, The George Washington University:  Weaned age in gorillas using trace element distributions in teeth

Melissa Wilson Sayres, Arizona State University:  Quantifying the variation and heritability of X-inactivation

Dr. Fredrick Kyalo Manthi of the National Museums of Kenya

Paleoanthropology

James Blinkhorn, University of Liverpool:  The Late Acheulean to Middle Palaeolithic transition in South Asia

Breanne Clifton, University of Connecticut:  Using phytoliths to reconstruct hominin adaptations and microhabitats during the Acheulian-MSA transition in the Kapthurin Formation, Kenya

Dylan Gaffney, University of Cambridge:  The initial colonisation of insular rainforests by archaic and modern hominins

Christopher Gilbert, Hunter College, City University of New York:  Primate evolution, chronology, and biogeography in the Indian Lower Siwaliks

Kevin Hatala, Chatham University:  Paleoecological investigation of 1.5 Ma footprint sites near Nariokotome, Kenya

Hannah Hilbert-Wolf, James Cook University:  Dating hominin fossils in the East African Rift, Malawi

Tania King, University College London:  Neanderthal occupation of the southern Caucasus: Chronological and biogeographic framework

Amanda Leiss, Yale University:  Paleoenvironmental context of ESA archaeology: An analysis of Gona fauna.

Fredrick Manthi, National Museums of Kenya:  Investigations of Middle Pleistocene sites in Natodomeri, northwestern Kenya

Laurent Marivaux, Institut des Sciences de l’Evolution de Montpellier (ISEM):  Oligocene and Miocene platyrrhine primates from Tarapoto, Peruvian Amazonia

Steffen Mischke, University of Iceland:  Environment of early hominins outside of Africa: The Nihewan Basin

Jonathan Reeves, The George Washington University:  Movement ecology and Pleistocene hominin land-use: Perspectives from Koobi Fora

Sileshi Semaw, CENIEH:  Gona Palaeoanthropological Research Project

Frido Welker, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology:  Towards complex Pleistocene hominin proteomes using multiple proteases.



Comments 0

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Related Content

08.15.18

The Great Migration

Grants, The Leakey Foundation
We are happy to report The Leakey Foundation's grants department has now migrated to the cloud version of our granting software, Grantmaking. Read on to learn more about some of the changes you may experience moving forward.