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Nutrition in Wild Orangutans: Insights into Human Health

Speaker(s): Erin Vogel

Houston, TX

March 1 @ 6:30 pm - 8:00 pm

$18
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Orangutans are highly intelligent, critically endangered great apes that live in the tropical forests of Sumatra and Borneo. Along with chimpanzees, gorillas, and bonobos, orangutans are remarkably similar to humans in terms of anatomy, physiology, and behavior.

Nutrition is critical to the health of humans and other primates, but we are still discovering how primate nutritional strategies affect the health of wild primates. Orangutans are a useful model for understanding human evolution because orangutans share several adaptations with us, including the propensity to store fat and utilize fat reserves when food is scarce.

A wild Bornean orangutan. Photo: Erin Vogel

Studying wild orangutans offers a unique opportunity to integrate metabolic physiology and health with foraging in an ecological context, providing a natural experiment to examine the multi-dimensional relationships of nutrition, energetics, and health. Primate dietary ecologist Dr. Erin Vogel will discuss how information from diet, behavior, and physiology can help us understand how orangutans are adapted for survival in Borneo’s forests and shed light on the current obesity epidemic in modern day humans.

This lecture is presented in partnership with the Houston Museum of Natural Science and the Houston Zoo. It is sponsored by The Brown Foundation Inc. with additional support from Ann and Gordon Getty and Camilla and George Smith.

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Details

Date:
March 1
Time:
6:30 pm - 8:00 pm
Cost:
$18
Event Category:

Organizer

The Leakey Foundation

Venue

The Houston Museum of Natural Science
5555 Hermann Park Drive
Houston, TX 77030 United States
+ Google Map
Phone:
(713) 639-4629
Website:
http://www.hmns.org/
Erin Vogel

Erin Vogel has received several  Leakey Foundation grants for her research on primate behavior. Vogel is assistant professor of anthropology and human evolutionary studies at Rutgers University. Her research interests revolve around how and why organisms acquire and select the food resources they need for survival. She studies how ecological variation influences the behavior, social organization, and morphology of non-human primates and early hominins. Vogel’s current research focuses on behavioral, physiological, and morphological adaptations to periods of fruit scarcity in wild orangutans. She examines how the properties of foods consumed by wild orangutans vary with the availability of preferred fruit.

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